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Top three reasons

Top Three Reasons Why People Buy Life Insurance

by Erie Insurance on
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/buy-life-insurance

Before you can get the life insurance coverage you need, you need to understand why you need it. While there are many reasons to buy life insurance, the most common reasons include:

  1. Final expenses: Final expenses refer to any expenses related to someone’s passing. This can include a casket, funeral, preparations, memorial service, cremation and more.

Life insurance for final expenses is worth considering—after all, the National Funeral Directors Association reports that the median price of a funeral with a casket is more than $7,000. Funeral directors say families without enough funds are forced to cut back on the service or ask friends and family for donations. A modest term life insurance policy can unburden your loved ones by taking care of these expenses.Read more

Auto Insurance Tax Deductible

Is Auto Insurance Tax Deductible? It Depends

by Carolyn Sennett on March 15, 2018
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/car-insurance-tax-deductible

Tax deductions are a way to lower your taxable income, so you can decrease the amount of taxes that you owe the government. Thinking about the different IRS-approved deductions as you prepare your tax returns may lead you to wonder: Is auto insurance tax deductible? The answer? It depends on how you use the car and other factors.

Using a car for work
Businesses that own and are dependent on the use of company cars or a fleet of vehicles as part of its operations may deduct auto insurance as an expense of the business. According to the IRS, you can deduct the necessary cost of insurance as a business expense, if it is for your trade, business or profession.Read more

Tips for Using Your Crock-Pot Safely

Tips for Using Your Crock-Pot Safely


by Jennifer Sonntag on
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/crock-pot-safety

Ahh…the go-to, easy-to-use appliance in our kitchens—crock-pots. They put the question, “What’s for dinner?” to rest and give our homes and apartments the home-cooked meal smell. Here are some trusted tips to consider when using your crock-pot:

Not everything is better with age
If you’re just starting out and you’ve been “gifted” your mom’s (or grandma’s) old crock-pot, there’s something to consider: age. While it might be in great working order, a vintage crock pot from the ‘70s or ‘80s with an insert firmly attached to the heating element might need to be upgraded. Newer crock-pots also offer the convenience of being able to lift out the insert (bonus, it’s dishwasher safe!).

Some older crock-pot models also had vent holes or a notch in the lid for a spoon.  While these might’ve been convenient, the rule of thumb is that crock-pot lids should fit snugly. If the lid is warped or has one of the mentioned “features,” steam and heat will escape. Cooking times could be off and you could end up with dry or burnt food.Read more

5 Driving and Car Maintenance Resolutions

5 Driving and Car Maintenance Resolutions


by Erie Insurance on December 27, 2017
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/5-driving-and-car-maintenance-resolutions

Whether it’s following a regular maintenance plan or making sure you’re prepared for an emergency, we’ve pulled together five driving and car maintenance resolutions for the New Year.

Procrastinating on regular maintenance. If you skimp on basic maintenance, your car can eventually quit or malfunction. If you’re on the road when it happens, you could lose control of your car, putting yourself and others in a dangerous situation. So, if it’s been awhile, get your car into the shop for an oil change. A mechanic can also check your vehicle’s filters, fluids, hoses and other key components. Also, ask about your vehicle’s maintenance schedule. Find out if any parts are wearing out before they break.Read more

Low-cost gift ideas for the holidays

Low-cost gift ideas for the holidays

By Shelly Gigante
Shelly Gigante specializes in personal finance issues. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications and news websites.
Source: https://blog.massmutual.com/post/low-cost-gift-ideas-for-the-holidays

A handmade scarf, baked goods, a cherished photo in a nice frame. Gifts for friends and family during the holiday season need not break the bank. In fact, some of the most meaningful gifts you can give are virtually free.

“The best gifts always come from the heart, because you know that person is thinking about you and not just running down to the store and picking up what they think is the hottest gift,” said Aileen Avery in an interview, author of Gift Rap: The History and Art of Gift Giving. “They actually gave it some thought.”

Zero- and low-cost gifts are not only potentially more thoughtful, but they can also help keep your budget in check, so you don’t spend months after the holidays digging out of high-interest debt, a scenario that is all too common.Read more

chimney check

Chimney Check-Up

by Abby Badach on November 1, 2017
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/chimney-check-up

The fireplace may be a happy spot for the family to gather ‘round. But did you know that fireplaces and chimneys caused 23,100 residential fires in the United States in 2013—and that those blazes caused $109.1 million in property damage and 10 fatalities?1

Statistics like these drive home the importance of scheduling an annual chimney inspection. Ashley Eldridge, director of education at the Chimney Safety Institute of America (CSIA), says that even homeowners who don’t use their fireplaces should spring for an inspection. That’s because a home’s other heating devices also release toxic gases through the chimney; when debris clogs its escape, those harmful fumes remain in your home.

“Preventative measures are typically much less expensive than repairs when you have a crisis,” Eldridge says. “It just makes sense to be ahead of the curve.”
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Drivers think distracted driving is causing more accidents than driving drunk, but a surprising number claim to be good at it

Source: Progressive
*https://www.nhtsa.gov/risky-driving/distracted-driving

Drivers under 35 are ten times more likely than drivers 55 and older to think they can safely text and drive

MAYFIELD VILLAGE, Ohio — September 6, 2017 — A new Progressive Insurance study shows about one third of drivers feel confident in their own ability to text and drive, yet the majority believe distracted driving is the biggest cause of auto accidents and more than 90% say it should be illegal.

The starkest difference in attitudes is between younger and older drivers. More than 60% of 18-34 year olds are confident in their ability to safely text while driving compared to less than 6% of individuals 55 and older.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2015 alone, 3,477 people were killed, and 391,000 were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers. Teens were the largest age group reported as distracted at the time of fatal crashes.*

“We hope this study starts conversations around distracted driving and how to reduce it. It’s especially interesting that most people recognize this activity is dangerous, yet many people feel confident in their own ability to text and drive,” said David Pratt, Business Leader of Usage Based Insurance at Progressive. “Based on early results with users of our Snapshot Mobile app, we’re optimistic that personalized feedback will encourage safer behavior. For years we’ve been helping Progressive customers improve their driving habits and save money with our traditional Snapshot program. Snapshot Mobile takes this to yet another level.”Read more

leaves

Don’t Leave the Leaves!

by Erie Insurance on October 16, 2017
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/dont-leave-leaves

Falling leaves may be pretty, but disposing of them can get ugly. Plus, options (or laws) for burning, bagging, and composting are different in each area. Here’s what to know:

Don’t burn
Many local governments are banning leaves and other yard trimmings from landfills, and you may be tempted to burn the leaves in your yard. Leaf burning, however, becomes a fire hazard that can lead to air pollution and health problems. The open burning of leaves produces particulate matter and hydrocarbons that contain toxic, irritant and carcinogenic compounds, such as carbon monoxide. Burning leaves is not recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)—nor is it legal in most states.

Do bag
If you’ve got a lot of time and a strong back (who has either, right?), bagging leaves is one option. This moderate physical activity helps build upper-body and core strength and gives you the opportunity to get outside for some fresh fall air. Remember, sticks, rocks, pine cones, limbs and other debris should not be mixed with loose leaves. Also, check with your municipality or borough to see what, if any, weight limit or bag color has been specified for leaf-filled bags, Then, when they’re ready to go, put them at the curb on your regular trash collection day or as directed.
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How to Organize a ‘Trunk-or-Treat’ Event

by Jennifer Sonntag on October 6, 2017
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/trunk-or-treat-event

There’s a new way to trick-or-treat that’s been gaining momentum in communities over the past few years. It’s called Trunk-or-Treat. Specific organizations or businesses partner with one another to offer a less-spooky alternative to the typical nighttime trick-or-treating Halloween event. It’s great for younger children and offers a shorter, friendlier Halloween experience.

All you need is a large parking lot, participating vehicles decorated for Halloween, and attendees to enjoy the fun. Here are some tips to help you plan a trunk or treat event:

Read more
back to college

Back to College Q & A

by Carolyn Sennett on August 16, 2017
Source: https://www.erieinsurance.com/blog/back-to-college

Is your child among the million students heading back to college any day now? If so, you’re probably busy helping them gather all the things they need for life away from home.

One of the things that you’ll want to discuss with them before they go back to college is how to keep their car and their belongings safe and protected. Here are some answers to a few of the most common questions that parents of college students often ask us.

Are my child’s belongings covered by my homeowners policy when she goes back to college?

That’s a great question. Students also often take expensive items to school like laptops, bikes and TVs, which can be pricey to replace if damaged or stolen items. The good news is that most insurers’ homeowners policies are designed to cover your child if something is stolen or destroyed.

At Erie Insurance, full-time students under the age of 24 are automatically covered under their parents’ policy. Part-time students and/or students who are 24 and older may need to take out a renters insurance policy to protect themselves and their belongings.
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